Conference for Interdisciplinary Approaches to Politics

About CIAP

The Conference for Interdisciplinary Approaches to Politics (CIAP) is an annual conference that concentrates on the study of political issues between disciplines in the humanities and social sciences. It aims to build bridges between disciplines and further awareness of scholarship from diverse backgrounds. Based on a changing annual theme the conference invites academics to consider approaches that might at first glance seem to be outside of their discipline.

Convenors:

Yuri van Hoef is a doctoral researcher in the School of Politics and International Studies at the University of Leeds. His research focuses on friendship in politics, specifically the role of friendship between heads of government in International Relations.

Gisli Vogler is is an ERC doctoral researcher at the School of Social and Political Science, University of Edinburgh, He is particularly interested in forms of realism and Hannah Arendt’s account of political judgement and his recent work includes a critical realist contribution to the conceptualisation of power.

Audrey Dugué-Nevers is a doctoral researcher in Politics and International Studies, in the School of East Asian Studies at the University of Sheffield. Her research focuses on China and soft power, specifically China-EU and how this American foreign policy concept meshes in a different political and cultural context, and is wielded to alter a state’s image and enhance international cooperation.

Joshua Hobbs is a doctoral researcher in the School of Politics and International Studies at the University of Leeds. Josh is particularly interested in the role of sentiment and moral psychology in understanding our obligations to distant others. His research seeks to address the motivational deficit in rationalist accounts of cosmopolitan duties.

Alex Prior is a doctoral researcher in the School of Politics and International Studies at the University of Leeds. Alex researching Parliament and public engagement. His academic interests include democratic narratives, symbolic representation and the role of affect in political engagement.

Demetris Tillyris has recently completed a PhD in Political Philosophy at the University of Leeds. His research focuses on problems of political morality, moral conflict and public ethics, with a particular focus on problems of dirty hands in public life. Recent publications include ‘Learning how not to be Good: Machiavelli and the Standard Dirty Hands Thesis’ (Ethical Theory and Moral Practice, 18:1, 2015), ‘The Virtue of Vice: A Defence of Hypocrisy in Democratic Politics’ Contemporary Politics,22:1, 2016), ‘After the Standard Dirty Hands Thesis: Towards a Dynamic Account of Dirty Hands in Politics’ (Ethical Theory and Moral Practice, 19:1, 2016), and ‘Political Integrity and Dirty Hands: Compromise and the Ambiguities of Betrayal’ (Res Publica, forthcoming).

Feel free to contact us with any questions through the contact form on this website or at ciap@leeds.ac.uk.

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